Dating a recreational drug user

Additionally, the UN found that Canada's participation in the global amphetamine trade was on the rise. The Sun quotes the reports assertion that "The number of [methamphetamine] laboratories reported by Mexico and Canada remains comparatively small, although the size of the laboratories may on average be larger." In the words of Canadian criminologist Neil Boyd, "There's a suggestion [in the report] that trafficking [in these drugs] has increased since 2003, [...] which is probably true.As the Sun states, "Export of illegal amphetamines produced in Canada, the report claims, has grown to 20 per cent of the country's output in 2007 from only five per cent in 2006." The article claims that the report's findings are not "particularly new information to local police forces and academics." However, some "academics were skeptical of the report's pedigree, considering it to be ideologically driven by hard-line U. But if you read the whole thing, Canada is just a small part in a global market." In a disappointing move, the Canadian House of Commons passed "the controversial C-15 mandatory minimum sentencing drug offense bill" in early June of 2009, according to the Drug War Chronicle's June 12 feature article ("In Bold Step Backward, Canadian House of Commons Passes Mandatory Minimum Drug Sentencing Bill").The drug got it's name from the Russian for crocodile because it leaves addicts with scaly, gangrenous skin.After months of abuse 29-year-old Angie's conditioned worsened to such an extent she was rushed to intensive care in the middle of the night with crippling stomach pains.

'Proof': Doctors say the deep scaly wounds are different from those seen on normal heroin addicts.

The training plan is part of Harper's recently announced anti-crime bill, the Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program, which he unveiled in anticipation of the "so-called Three Amigos Summit," an annual meeting of North American leadership from Mexico, the United States, and Canada.

Harper's new program will require Canada to "invest as much as million a year in projects across the Americas that combat the illicit drug trade, corruption, human trafficking, and other regional problems." Nearly half a million dollars (0,000) "will go to Mexico to help fight its drug war." Thus, as part of his attempt to "help" Mexico fend off cartels, Harper has authorized Canadian Mounties to "train 300 mid-level Mexican police officers with the help of the United States and other countries.

The kits, which are also distributed - though differently - in Prince George and Toronto, "include a mouth piece and a push stick," which advocates say could help reduce "the transmission of communicable disease[s]" like Hepatitis C; as the Bulletin states, "research has shown that crack pipes can carry hepatitis C-positive blood." The kits will be distributed "through the same agencies distributing needles for drug injection" and can be provided at a negligible cost to taxpayers.

Moreover, the Bulletin notes, "unlike needles," crack kits "could be reused by drug addicts several times." Victoria should be applauded for approving this laudable idea that not only assists crack users in ingesting the drug more safely but also expands upon the success of harm reduction measures more typically associated with heroin users.

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